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Information Literacy Across the Curriculum

ILAC Forms

• Adobe PDF
• Word Document

General Information

To satisfy the ILAC requirement in the MCSP department the student must execute a specified number of information searches on subjects related to their major field. The content and specifications are to be negotiated between the student and a department faculty member. Usually these will be done as part of a paper or presentation for a class but need not be. The usual number of information searches required is three.

A qualifying search is an annotated bibliography of at least seven (topic dependent and determined by the faculty sponsor) reputable sources on a topic related to the student's major. In order to receive credit, the student must identify a problem requiring an information solution and seek approval for the project from an MCSP faculty member before work begins. An MCSP faculty member must also certify that the information solution was successfully executed, meeting or exceeding minimal standards for information literacy. (See the form for the specific standards used.) The information searches may be performed as part of assigned coursework, a non-graded component of a course, or in conjunction with an MCSP presentation.

The spirit of related to the major means that they probably will occur in required/elective courses within the major with at least one in a course with the specific MCSP prefix for the major (CS for CS/CIS, MA for MA/MAED, PHY for Physics or Physics ED and EG for Engineering Science). e.g. , A CS or CIS major will do information searches in required CS courses. A CS/MA double major will split them between CS and MA courses.


General Procedure

  1. The student will approach a faculty member in their discipline and (kindly) request that they sponsor an ILAC information search. This will usually be an instructor in a major class they are currently taking.
  2. After the faculty members agrees, they will negotiate the specifications.
  3. The student will fill out the first half of the ILAC form and have the sponsor sign the pre-information search portion.
  4. The faculty member will complete the evaluation portion during/after the information search, sign it and return the form to the student.
  5. If the information search was rated successful, the student will turn the form to Dr. Breutzmann for recording and storage.

Manhattan Records
Records of successful information searches will be kept by Dr. Breutzmann and uploaded regularly to a manhattan site for student/faculty viewing. Upon completion of the first successful OCAC presentation or ILAC information search, the student will be entered into the database and be given an account and password for the manhattan site or they may request one prior to meeting their first ILAC/OCAC requirement.

Students who have only one major and that one is in the MCSP department
You are required to do at least three ILAC information searches related to the major.

Students with multiple majors all of which are in the MCSP department
You are required to do at least three ILAC information searches. At least one must be in each major. e.g., a Math/CS double major does a minimum of three including one in CS, one in Math, and a third in either.

Students with multiple majors at least one in MCSP and at least one outside MCSP
Students with at least one major outside the department must meet the ILAC requirements of the outside major(s) and do one ILAC information search in each of their MCSP majors.

Oral Communication Across the Curriculum

OCAC Forms

• Adobe PDF
• Word Document

General Information

To satisfy the OCAC requirement in the MCSP department the student must execute a specified number of oral presentations on subjects related to their major field. The content and specifications are to be negotiated between the student and a department faculty member. Usually these will be done as part of a class but may be outside presentations e.g., at a club meeting, at a conference, etc.

The usual number of presentations is three, one of which must involve faculty intervention. Faculty intervention means that the sponsoring faculty member will be involved in the presentation preparation process. For example, the faculty member may choose to require an outline or to review slides ahead of time or view a practice presentation or video. The sponsoring faculty member will determine the procedure.

A qualifying presentation is a talk of at least 12 minutes on a topic related to the student's major given to an audience of at least three people. In order to receive credit the talk must be approved beforehand by a member of the MCSP faculty. An MCSP faculty member must also certify that the talk was successfully executed, meeting or surpassing minimal standards or effective communication. (See the form for the specific standards that will be evaluated.) The talks may be given as part of assigned coursework, a non-graded component of a course, or at conferences, seminars, club meetings or other public events.

The spirit of related to the major means that they probably will occur in required/elective courses within the major with at least one in a course with the specific MCSP prefix for the major (CS for CS/CIS, MA for MA/MAED, PHY for Physics or Physics ED and EG for Engineering Science). e.g. , A CS or CIS major will give at least some presentations in required CS courses or CS conferences, or CS club meetings and the rest in related settings. A CS/MA double major will split them between CS and MA courses.


General Procedure

  1. The student will approach a faculty member in their discipline and (kindly) request that they sponsor an OCAC presentation. This will usually be an instructor in a major class they are currently taking.
  2. After the faculty members agrees, they will negotiate the specifications.
  3. The student will fill out the first half of the OCAC form and have the sponsor sign the pre-presentation portion.
  4. The faculty member will complete the evaluation portion during/after the presentation, sign it and return the form to the student.
  5. If the presentation was rated successful , the student will turn the form to Dr. Breutzmann for recording and storage.

Manhattan Records
Records of successful presentations will be kept by Dr. Breutzmann and uploaded regularly to a manhattan site for student/faculty viewing. Upon completion of the first successful OCAC presentation or ILAC information search, the student will be entered into the database and be given an account and password for the manhattan site or they may request one prior to meeting their first OCAC/ILAC requirement.

Students who have only one major and that one is in the MCSP department
You are required to do at least three OCAC presentations related to the major. At least one must involve faculty intervention.

Students with multiple majors all of which are in the MCSP department
You are required to do at least three OCAC presentations. At least one in each major must involve faculty intervention. e.g., a Math/CS double major does a minimum of three including one in CS with faculty intervention, one in Math with faculty intervention, and a third in either major which need not involve faculty intervention.

Students with multiple majors at least one in MCSP and at least one outside MCSP
Students with at least one major outside the department must meet the OCAC requirements of the outside major(s) and give one OCAC presentation with faculty intervention in each of their MCSP majors.

Linux Lab

The lab comprises a cluster of workstations running Debian Linux with a central file server. The machines are located in SC 347 and are also available for remote login using SSH and VNC (see remote login to the right).

The lab is used primarily for upper-level Computer Science and Computer Information Systems classes but is also available for general use by other Wartburg students. If you would like an account contact Dr. John Zelle.

The default desktop environment on these machines is KDE, but others are also available. Standard software includes programming environments for C, C++, Java, Python, Perl, Prolog, Scheme, and COBOL as well as text-formatting utilities (Latex), editors (emacs and vi) and a host of productivity programs, image viewers/editors, and of course games.

UNIX / LINUX Overview


Shell Selection | Shell Features | Environment Variables | Jobs | Files | Essentials 

Selecting a Shell

To some extent, the "feel" of interacting with a Unix system depends on the command interpreter or "shell" that you are using. Different Unix systems have different shells, and users can often select among a number of different shells to suit their own tastes.

The most commonly used shell in the Linux world is "bash". It is an enhanced version of a traditional shell known as the Bourne shell. Bash is the "Bourne-again shell". Some other common shells are based on the original "C" shell (csh).

Shell Features (tcsh and bash)

Command recall
You can cycle through previous commands using the up and down arrows.


Command/filename completion.
If you type the first few characters of a command or file/directory name and then press the tab key, the shell will attempt to complete the command or name. If there is more than one valid completion, the shell will complete the command up to the ambiguity. Pressing tab again will show the possible completions.
Filename wildcards.
You can specify a "set" of files using "*" to represent a sequence of characters. For example, "foo*" matches all the files starting with "foo".

Environment Variables

Environment variables are are often used in Unix to set general properties of the system. For example the variable PATH determines what directories will be searched when trying to lookup a command. DISPLAY determines the machine on which windows will be displayed when using X, the Unix graphical interface. Some useful commands:

• echo $<variable> display the contents of the variable. Example: "echo $PATH"
• setenv $<variable> $<value> (c-shells only) set the value of a variable. To add a new directory to a path, a c-shell user would do something like "setenv PATH ${PATH}:/home/myfiles/bin". The ${PATH} is the old value of PATH and causes the new directory to be appended.
• unsetenv <variable> (c-shells only) clears out an environment variable. For example, for a text-based login session, a user might to "unsetenv DISPLAY" so that certain commands (e.g. emacs) do not try to create a window.
• <variable>=<value>export<variable> (Bourne-shells) sets the value of an environment variable. Note there should be no spaces around the "=". Example: "PATH=${PATH}:/home/myfiles/bin ; export PATH"
• <variable> = to unset a variable. Example "DISPLAY="

Sometimes there are some variables that we always want to set. We can customize the environment automatically by placing shell commands in a file that is automatically consulted when the shell starts. For bash, the commands in ".bash_profile" are performed on login, and those in ".bashrc" are performed whenever a new shell is started.. For c-shells, the commands in ".login" are performed when you login, and those in ".chrc" are performed each time you start a shell. Usually, you would modify the commands in .login. Note these configuration files start with ".", so they are hidden files (see section on files).

Job Control

To execute a command, simply type the name of the command at the shell prompt. For example, to start the emacs text editor, type: emacs . When the command has finished executing, you will get back the shell prompt. Putting an "&" at the end of a command causes it to run in the background. That is, the shell prompt returns immediately so that more commands can be issued. The background command will run concurrently with any subsequent commands. In this fashion, it is possible to be running multiple "jobs" at the same time. Here are some commands for manipulating multiple jobs:

• jobs list the currently running jobs.
• <ctrl>-z suspend the current foreground job.
• bg restart a suspended job in the background.
• fg restart a suspended job in the foreground.
• kill %<number> kill (terminate) the job with the given number (obtained from "jobs").
• kill -9 %<number> terminate with extreme prejudice.

Files and Directories

Unix maintains a tree-structured directory system. When you log in, you are automatically placed in your "home" directory. You can make subdirectories to organize your files. In referring to directories, there are some special conventions:

• '~' represents your home directory (can also use '$HOME')
• '.' represents the current directory.
• '..' represents the parent of the current directory.

File-handling commands:

• ls list files in directory.
• ls -l directory listing in extended format
• ls -a directory Listing including hidden files (starting with ".")
• mkdir filename create a new (sub)directory
• cd directory Change directory
• cd .. change to parent directory
• more filename display contents of file one page at a time
• cat filename display contents of entire file
• rm filename delete the specified file

Other Essential Commands:

• exit leave current command shell. At top-level, this logs you out
• passwd change password on local machine. In the UCL, this command is an alias for yppasswd
• yppasswd change your password on central password server
• man command display manual page entry describing the command
• man -k term display commands related to this term
• xterm (or konsole) & start up a graphical terminal (only used under X-windows)

USEFUL EMACS COMMANDS

Cursor | Files | Help | Editing | Buffers | Search | Compiling | Panic

Emacs is a very powerful multi-windowing text editor. You can get a tutorial by typing <Ctrl>-h t (Control-h followed by a t) from the fire-up screen. If you are brand new to emacs, it would be worth your while to walk through it. In the commands below, the notation "C-" indicates a control character (hold down <Ctrl> and type the character), and "M-" indicates a meta-character. On most terminals, a meta character is obtained by prefixing the character with <Esc> (i.e. push and release the escape key before hitting the character). Some terminals may have an <Alt>, <Edit> or <Meta&gt key that works like a <Shift&gt for typing meta-characters.

Cursor movement
Some terminals may allow use of arrow keys, if not:

• C-f forward one char
• C-b backward one char
• C-p up to previous line
• C-n down to next line
• C-a beginning of line
• C-e end of line
• C-v scroll screen down
• M-v scroll screen up
• M-> end of file
• M-< top of file
• C-l re-center screen on current line

File manipulation:

• C-x C-f open or create a file
• C-x C-v replace buffer with a different file
• C-x i insert file at current cursor position
• C-x C-s save buffer to file (This may hang your terminal, use
• C-q to restart it).
• C-x s save all changed buffers.
• C-x C-w write buffer to file (will prompt for file name).
• C-x C-c save buffers and exit emacs
• C-z suspend emacs (use "fg" to restart where you left off)

Help commands:

• C-h enter help system
• C-h f get help for a given emacs command
• C-h k get help for a certain keystroke sequence
• M-x "apropos" Find commands relevant to a key word.

Editing Commands:

• <delete> or <backspace> Delete previous character 
• C-d delete the current character
• C-k cut to the end of line into "clipboard"
• C-<space> to mark the beginning of a region.
• C-w cut region between mark and cursor.
• M-w copy region between mark and cursor to clipboard.
• C-y "yank" (paste) clipboard text back into buffer at cursor.
• C-_ or C-x u undo previous edit (can go back multiple steps).

Buffer manipulation:

• C-x 2 split screen into two windows
• C-x 1 revert to one window
• C-x o switch to other window
• C-x b change buffer displayed in this window.
• C-x k kill this buffer (close the file).

Searching:

• C-s incremental search forward
• C-r incremental search backward
• <esc> exit a search
• M-% search and replace

Compiling:

• M-x "Compile" Start a compilation. Emacs will prompt for a compiling command (suggesting "make -k"). Enter the appropriate command (i.e. "g++ -o myprogram myprogram.cpp")
• C-x Cycle through messages in the compile buffer. Emacs will show the line on which the error is reported in the editing buffer.

Universal panic:

• C-g Quit this command